MTB Ride: Kaybiang Tunnel Loop (203kms)

Kaybiang Loop
  • Distance (From Paranque): 203 Kms
  • Days cycled/Hours to complete: 1 day/18hours
  • Saddle time: 12 hours

Kaybiang Loop

Route: (Counter clockwise via Daang Hari Road)

  • Paranaque: Sucat via West Service Rd – BF Homes
  • Muntinlupa: Alabang Zapote Road – Daang Hari Rd.
  • Cavite: Bacoor – Imus – General Trias – Tanza – Naic – Maragondon – Ternate (Puerto Azul)
  • Kaybiang Tunnel: Nasugbu Ternate Highway (Pico de Loro, Patungan Cove)
  • Batangas: Nasugbu, Tagaytay-Nasugbu Highway (Looc, Lumbangan, Tuy, Kaylayaw, Evercrest/Mt. Batulao Jumpoff)
  • Tagaytay: Tagaytay-Calamba Rd.
  • Laguna: Sta. Rosa (Nuvali, Paseo de Sta. Rosa) – Binan – San Pedro
  • Muntinlupa: Alabang (South Station, West Gate, Daang Hari Rd.)

The Tunnel

It was a looong drive from Cavite to the western beaches and roads of Batangas back then. Not until the popular Kaybiang Tunnel was constructed. Built in 2013, Kaybiang Tunnel is the longest underground passage in the country with a length of 300 meters.

kaybiang tunnel loop

The idea of a pathway that pierces through Pico de Loro to connect two provinces is convenient and fascinating at the same time. Travel time by car used to be 4 hours but thanks to the tunnel, the trip can now be completed in about an hour and a half. Today, it is a popular destination for cyclists, motorcycle riders, and road trippers.

Meetup: Daanghari Road

kaybiang tunnel loop

We could have taken Aguinaldo Highway but since it was a Saturday, we assumed that there would be a heavy volume of vehicles. Concerned with our busy lungs and road safety, we decided to take the wider Daang Hari Road instead.

kaybiang tunnel loop

My friends and I assembled in the corner of Daanghari and Alabang-Zapote Road. We started at around 8am which is already late for a Kaybiabg loop ride. I figured that we should start at this time since one of my friends barely slept (Night shift challenges). 

The Towns of Cavite

kaybiang tunnel loop

Bacoor and Imus were a bit busy when we reached Cavite. There were several trucks and buses whizzing past us but the roads were wide enough. The adventure accentuated when we passed by General Trias bound to Tanza. We took the back roads to avoid the congested highway but the path got rougher.

kaybiang tunnel loop

We pedaled our way through a rugged trail. Potholes, damp ground, and puddles made it a bit of a chore but we pushed through. At the end of the path is a bridge that connected a small barangay to the highway. It was such an unfamiliar route, but I think this “shortcut” made our ride more interesting. 

kaybiang tunnel loop

kaybiang tunnel loop

There was also a brief, unexpected rain as we headed to the town proper. It was a weird noon time weather as we cycled through the red steel bridge bound to Naic.

Naic to Maragondon

The busy roads were eventually replaced by greener backgrounds when we reached Maragondon. What made the ride more challenging is the steeper ascent. The sun also came out at this point making it more difficult for us to grind our gears. We eventually took quick rests while marveling at the views of mountain ranges in the west and the blue waters of Manila bay and a clear view of Corregidor Island in the east.

kaybiang tunnel loop

kaybiang tunnel loop

We then reached Puerto Azul at past noon time. The scorching heat was just too much, good thing there was a nearby store where we took a shade, got hydrated, and recuperated for a few minutes before taking on the popular “Magnetic Hill.”

Pico de Loro Jumpoff

Another resting spot is the DENR station at the foot of Mt. Pico de Loro along the Nasugbu-Ternate Highway. The lack of sleep is taking its toll, making us rest a little longer. The rich, green trees, the peaceful and quiet surroundings, and the sound of the gushing stream at the foot of the mountain made us relax our tired selves.

kaybiang tunnel loop

The skies were eventually enveloped by clouds and a slight drizzle was underway. This and the ointment that I put on my back and legs helped a lot. After a few more minutes, we were back on our saddles to take on the steep, winding mountain pass.

kaybiang tunnel loop

Kaybiang Tunnel

We have finally reached Kaybiang Tunnel at around 1pm! Since it was past lunch time, we arrived at an almost empty site. The supposed stop over of motorcycle riders and cyclists was a bit quiet that time. The only sound that could be heard were the roars of engines and horns of vehicles as they passed by the tunnel.

kaybiang tunnel loop

It was a surprise to us when we found out that there is a stairway going up the top of the tunnel. I hiked to the top after having a sumptuous bowl of goto and hamburger in a nearby eatery.

You’ll find yourself face to face with the west ridge of Pico de Loro when you get to the top. Look up and you’ll see giganic branches and leaves that covers the mountain walls. Look down and it is an amazing view of people taking photos in front of the tunnel.

kaybiang tunnel loop

It was time for us to go. After 2 hours of hanging out, taking photos, and a well-deserved nap, we readied ourselves to ride through Kaybiang Tunnel. 

kaybiang tunnel loop

Pedaling inside the dark passage is an overwhelming experience. 300 meters seems to go too fast when you are enjoying yourself. It kind of reminded me of when we biked inside Malinta Tunnel in Corregidor but this one was longer.

Nasugbu, Batangas

Perhaps the longest place that we cycled that day was Nasugbu. It took us hours to pass through several towns and Barangays followed by a veeery long, and gradual ascent going to Tagaytay.

kaybiang tunnel loop

We made several stopovers upon exiting Kaybiang Tunnel to appreciate the spectacular views of Batangas’ coves with its crystal blue waters and lush green mountain ranges. I find it an enjoyable experience as we descended along the mountain pass. It was an amazing sight as we pedaled while being surrounded by gigantic and verdant highlands on one side and the vast blue waters on the other.

kaybiang tunnel loop

The views were then replaced by small towns, rich green planes, and a mountainous background. It got darker as we reached the Tagaytay-Nasugbu highway. With flashlights on, we continued until we reached the popular summer destination by 8pm.

Tagaytay – Descend to Laguna

We headed to the local market to exit the place via Santa Rosa-Tagaytay Road. My friends and I were worn out by the long, gradual ascent in Nasugbu that we considered this route as a reward. Imagine descending from Tagaytay to Santa Rosa at around 40-50kph while you’re barely pedaling. What a rush! Luckily, there weren’t enough vehicles when we took this path. 

kaybiang tunnel loop

We ended up stopping over in Nuvali where we just dumped our bikes on the grass and laid down to rest.

Manila South Road

This is the same route we used when we did the Laguna Loop but instead of coming from Calamba, we took a turn from Santa Rosa. It was a straightforward path as we passed by Binan, San Pedro, Muntinlupa, and finally, Alabang.

kaybiang tunnel loop

Back to Daang Hari

Finally! After hours of pedaling under the sun, a bit of rain, and weaving through the southern Manila traffic, we have completed the loop at past midnight. 

kaybiang tunnel loop


Key points/Tips:

  • Start early – We started at around 8am which is already late for the loop. Cyclists usually start at around 4 or 5am. This is in order to get to the tunnel earlier and not get drained by the heat especially on the road bound to Ternate.
  • Hydrate! I brought 2 liters of water and an extra bottle to pour some on me if the sun decided to rape my skin.
  • Be careful on the corners – Especially after passing through Kaybiang Tunnel. There are several steep sections and corners are a bit sharp. Better slow down and watch out for upcoming vehicles.
  • Wear a facemask – Especially in busy parts of the city or town.
  • Pack light.
  • Get plenty of sleep the night before the ride.

kaybiang tunnel loop

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One Reply to “MTB Ride: Kaybiang Tunnel Loop (203kms)”

  1. Very impressive blog.

    Interesting article right on the subject.

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